Airborne Awesomosity

The De Havilland DH.104 Dove

It will buff out

de Havilland Dove

[image credit Wayne Moyer 2011]

For over twenty years the de Havilland Dove served the worlds feeder airlines simply and efficiently.  Today this Dove has had her wings clipped and is awaiting her turn at a restoration.

 

The rain in Reading falls mainly on the plane

[image credit Wayne Moyer 2011]

The de Havilland Dove served its various aerial operators for almost twenty years. Like most short haul airliners it is also unusual to find one sitting at an air museum. The Mid Atlantic Air Museum prides itself that each aircraft it owns can fly or will be after restoration. It is currently working on a long restoration of a P-61 Black Widow that will make it one of a small handful of operators of this type of aircraft in the world. With the focus on this plane several of their aircraft sit outside waiting for their turn and get beaten up by the elements. Still their day will come.

 

 

de Havilland Dove in Reading Pennsylvania

[image credit Wayne Moyer 2011]

The performance of the aircraft wasn’t spectacular but it served its purpose. Here are the stats by way of Wikipedia.org and Jane’s All the Worlds Aircraft.

 

General characteristics

Performance

de Havilland Dove in Reading Pennsylvania

[image credit Wayne Moyer 2011]

 

The future of this aircraft isn’t as far gone as you might think. They have restored aircraft at this museum in worse condition then this Dove. When it gets restored it will be one of those lesser known aircraft that I look forward to seeing in the air once again. We all know the greats of World War II but its workhorses like these that could use a little more attention given to their cause.

  • OA5599

    Is airplane restoration like car restoration in that the goal is to use date-coded hoses and OEM fasteners, or does it allow more leeway to use any part that fits and won't cause a crash?

    • CaptianNemo2001

      If you start modding its a restomod.

      Slick plane. Looks like it would be a fun one to have in place of a private jet.

    • fodder650

      I'm pretty sure that there is leeway with it but I never asked. I would imagine anything that affects safety would be allowed for obvious reasons.

    • Number_Six

      Aircraft restoration is like building a Shinto or Buddhist temple. The actual matter isn't what's important – if your wooden temple burns down or gets swept away in a tsunami, then you simply rebuild it using whatever is available. Itsukushima shrine, pictured below, has had both those events hit it many times over the centuries. It might not be the exact same building that it was in the 12th century, but at least it still looks and performs the same.
      <img src="http://www.fantasticjapan.com/images/itsukushima-shrine-1.jpg&quot; />

  • Number_Six

    Fodder, I've got a bunch of pics of these in BWIA (British West Indies Airways) and LIAT (Live Island Any Time) colours…actually it's Leeward Islands Air Transport, but you can guess why we called it the former. Lovely aircraft to be a passenger in as long as you're not in a hurry. Anyway, I'll shoot them over to you if I can find them.

    • fodder650

      Please do. I believe you can use fodder at atomictoasters dot com.

  • I love raised cockpits on aircraft of this era.

    +1 on the private plane idea. I'm all for contributing towards an official Atomictoasters / Hooniverse Corporate Plane fund. My $6 is waiting.

  • booniefez

    Super plane (I would say that living near Hatfield, Herts in the UK).

    Good wiki page;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Dove

    Seem to remember from somewhere that as they loaded from the back on tricycle undercart they occasionally went nose up when loading.

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